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Peachtree Cove RV Park – A Wonderful Place to Stay!

Most of you receiving updates from Neely Marketplace have probably not heard about Peachtree Cove RV Park. Let us fill you in.

A year and a half ago, the Lord opened up the opportunity for a new business venture. We were thrilled to take on the family project of restoring a once-thriving RV Park to something of its former beauty and success. The Lord has blessed our efforts and the summer of 2019 marks the middle of our second season as RV Park owners. We have loved being able to meet many new people and provide a quiet haven for those needing a place to stay.

Visit our website and plan to come see us! 

Visit our FREE DOWNLOADS page and get your copy of our camping checklist. It makes the planning and packing stage of the family trip so much easier!

Independence Day Sale

When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness…

Use coupon code FREEDOM2019 to receive 40% off the Lest We Forget recording and download and all companion sheet music downloads* until July 5.

*Companion sheet music titles include Prayer of Dependence, Revive Us, Godly Heroes, and Lord, Please Forgive

Summer Highlights at Neely Marketplace

Summer is one of the very best times of year, says the person writing this post. The rush of spring has begun to settle down as the maturity of summer takes its place. The grass is growing steadily, trees are fully leaved, flowers are beginning to bloom, garden produce is starting to come in; everything is just perfect!

Welcome to summer at Neely Marketplace! To celebrate the opening of June, receive 30% off Sun & Sea candles from The Candle Cove at Peachtree. Bring the fresh fragrance of the outdoors, indoors for times when it doesn’t work to be outside. You don’t want to miss these!

With the entrance of June, however, also come the sometimes startling realization that 2019 is almost half gone. It is sobering to step back from all the activity of life and see the speed with which time passes. Most resources can be replaced, but once time is gone, it’s gone.

I love to keep a journal – somewhere to record the many things the Lord is teaching me, the blessings He sends, insights from the Scriptures, and more. I encourage you: leave a record of the wonderful things God is doing in your life for those who follow behind. You will never regret being able to look on specific instances of His love and provision recorded at the time they took place. 

How do you manage your time? And do you have a record of what has filled it?
Check out these two product lines to help manage the rest of 2019 and to document it for future reference. You won’t be sorry!

Sightreading: An Essential

The title here says it all. For any musician, the skill of sightreading is absolutely essential. It doesn’t matter if you are primarily a church musician, orchestra player, teacher, or something else – there is sure to come a time when you are handed music you have never seen before and asked to play it with very little, if any, notice.

So how do we get there? I think the principles of learning to sightread are pretty much the same for most instruments. Sightreading is, at the most basic level, excellent eye-brain-hand coordination. The information has to be read, processed in a matter of seconds or fractions of seconds, and put out through the fingers. Ideally, when sightreading you will be able to maintain a metronomic tempo that moves you steadily through the measures with a large percentage of accurate notes (actually, the ideal is 100% accuracy, but after all, we’re sightreading….).

As with anything, starting out right from the beginning can make all the difference in the world. I make a point with all of my students, especially the beginners, to have them sightreading something at every lesson. More often than not, the beginners end up sightreading a small handful of short pieces during each lesson. This plants the seed for the skill very early on and it will naturally grow and mature with the student’s mastery of the instrument as they move through literature. This is definitely the best way to learn or teach it in my experience, so if you have beginning students, get them sightreading right away!

Sometimes, though, sightreading slips through the cracks. This has, unfortunately, happened with some of my students. Additionally, sometimes I take a transfer student who’s previous teacher didn’t work on this and so then I have an intermediate student who is not comfortable with the sightreading process. The good news is, it’s never too late to learn! Intermediate and early advanced pianists have an excellent chance at mastering sightreading even if they haven’t done it from the time they started lessons. Below are a few helps for learning to sightread that I have found immensely helpful both in my own journey as a musician as well as from a teacher’s perspective.

  • Do it often! For older students, I find it helpful to assign a book strictly for this purpose that they can do on their own every day.
  • Start simple! Your student may be able to play Level 10 literature, but is on par with a Level 2 sightreader. Find music with which they can succeed, no matter how easy it feels, and gradually work up the ladder.
  • Practice with variety! Is your student burned out with stumbling through the hymnbook? Try a series of simple etudes for a change (see below for recommendations). Don’t always stick with solo works, either – practice with simple accompaniments for children’s choir or other instrumental soloists.
  • Repeat it! Even though technically speaking you can only sightread something once, if you are not consciously putting effort into learning it, your brain will still process much of the information as new. Use this to your advantage and play the same thing over and again, and each time you will pick up on something else and increase your accuracy, thus combining the benefits of sightreading and structured practice.
  • KTS! This stands for Key signature, Time signature, Scan. These three things are perhaps the most important in any sightreading situation – special thanks to Mr. Pinner of Pinner Studios and Pinner Publications for this wonderful tip!

 

I have found the Technical Skills book by compiled and edited by Jane Magrath to be an excellent resource in helping students sightread successfully. Check out these wonderful technique building books as a resource for beginning sightreaders.

look inside Masterwork Technical Skills Level 1-2. Edited by Jane Magrath. Graded Standard Repertoire; Masterworks; Piano Collection; Technique Musicianship. Technical Skills. Masterwork. Book. 24 pages. Alfred Music #00-6583. Published by Alfred Music (AP.6583).
look inside Masterwork Technical Skills Level 3. Edited by Jane Magrath. Graded Standard Repertoire; Masterworks; Piano Collection; Technique Musicianship. Technical Skills. Masterwork. Book. 32 pages. Alfred Music #00-6584. Published by Alfred Music (AP.6584).
look inside Masterwork Technical Skills Level 4. Edited by Jane Magrath. Graded Standard Repertoire; Masterworks; Piano Collection; Technique Musicianship. Technical Skills. Masterwork. Book. 32 pages. Alfred Music #00-6585. Published by Alfred Music (AP.6585).

 

If you found this post helpful, please consider leaving feedback in the comment section below. Also, read other posts on music pedagogy here.

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In Righteous Paths is now in stock!

In Righteous Paths is a collection of sacred solo arrangements for intermediate viola, complete with piano accompaniments. These arrangements were written with the amateur violist in mind, but are also appropriate for those who have reached more advanced levels. Also included is a bonus arrangement of Abide with Me set for violin/viola duet with piano accompaniment. Artistic yet simple, these solos are perfect for church services, sacred recitals, special events, and more.

Titles include: Love Divine, All Loves Excelling, Shepherd’s Hymn, Blessed Assurance, At the Cross, Day by Day, Redeemed, How I Love to Proclaim It, Just as I Am, Praise Him! Praise Him!, and Abide with Me.

A spiral book of scores, supplemented with a separate booklet of solo parts is included in purchase.

A New Product Line is Here!

That’s right! We are thrilled to be able to offer Legacy journals as a part of Neely Marketplace’s unique collection of products for living, gifts for giving. For years, we have enjoyed giving and using these beautiful journals and it is with great joy that we are able to make them available to each of you.

With a variety of covers to choose from, Legacy journals are sure to meet your journaling, note-taking, and creative writing needs, as well as those of your friends. Hop over to our online store and take a look!

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P.S. Don’t forget about upcoming holidays and occasions: Easter – April 21, Mother’s Day – May 12, graduations, and more!

Restock sale extended, only better! | All Thera-pit-ics are 20% off!

We couldn’t let a good thing go,

so we are extending the restock sale on Thera-pit-ic packs until April 1! Are you looking ahead toward special events like Mother’s Day and Father’s Day? How about a unique gift to commemorate the resurrection of our Lord on Easter? Thera-pit-ics aren’t just good for nationally observed holidays, though.

They make perfect wedding gifts, birthday gifts, hostess gifts, end-of-schoolyear teacher gifts, “I appreciate you ” gifts, and more. The sky is the limit for how you can give this useful and unique product all year long! 

The good news doesn’t end there, however…

Not only is the restock sale extended, but it now includes the entire line of Thera-pit-ic prints. Come by our online store and check out the wonderful options that are available. There’s something for everyone!

Thera-pit-ics restocked! | 20% off spring favorites and more!

There are several favorites in the Thera-pit-ics line that were restocked last week – just in time to prepare for the heat of summer! In addition to Spring Rush, Cloud & Sunshine Floral, Cloud & Sunshine Stripe, and Moroccan Sunshine, four other prints have been marked as 20% off, simply to celebrate their renewed presence on the shelf. These celebrated four are:

  • Ribbon Stripe
  • Beach Towel
  • Picnic Bouquet (pictured below)
  • Yum! Black Cherry – standard favorite!

These are all-time bestsellers, so take action now. They won’t last forever!

Welcome Spring! | Thera-pit-ics Sale

We are enjoying the brighter atmosphere that comes along with early spring. The world out-of-doors holds an appearance of warmth as the bright sun, blue skies, and greener grass join together in a glorious, God-painted landscape. 

To welcome the first signs of spring, we have put select Thera-pit-ic prints 20% off. Visit our online store and check out with

  • Spring Rush
  • Moroccan Sunshine
  • Cloud & Sunshine Floral
  • Cloud & Sunshine Stripe

   There is no coupon necessary to receive the discount!

Piano Accompaniment

Something has surfaced in my teaching quite a bit recently, and this is the subject of training accompanists. Typically, an accompanist is a pianist because the bulk of repertoire is written with piano specific accompaniments, or piano reductions of orchestra accompaniments. With a very few exceptions, this is the case in classically styled sacred music, probably even more so than it is in classical music itself. Then, when we consider the average church, most of them use piano or a keyboard instrument, where other classical chamber groups or orchestras may be lacking. With this in view, it becomes tremendously important for a ministry-minded pianist to learn how to accompany others in all sorts of settings from all types of music, whether it is classical rep, or the more common improvised accompaniment out of a hymnbook, or a choral arrangement, or the accompaniment for another instrumentalist.

There are many things to consider as an accompanist, with the biggest being that the accompanist must support, not dominate. This was always a bit of a challenge for me to grasp when I was first learning, especially when I was handed accompaniment parts for particularly exciting violin solos or vocal pieces. Nevertheless, this is arguably the most important thing for an accompanist to realize, for it is not only crucial in and of itself, but also effects every other part of how they play.

Moving on to the more practical side of things, some quick helps for learning to accompany are:

Count. A no-brainer? Maybe, but while most beginners are continually being hammered with repetitions of “1 2 3 4,” “1+2+3+4+,” “trip-l-et, trip-l-et, trip-l-et,” or the more appealing “straw-ber-ry, straw-ber-ry, straw-ber-ry” or some other such form of counting, more advanced musicians somehow loose track of this most important technique. Find the quarter beat (or other main beat) and stick with it. Tap your foot, nod your head, do anything to keep on track with the person you are accompanying.

Analyze. As the supporting musician, you have a very unique role. The music written to enhance the soloist is usually full of embellishments and ideas that duplicate those found in the solo or choral parts, but are often woven in so as not to draw direct attention. When preparing to accompany, spend some time with the score, and look to see how the accompaniment part and the solo part work together. Look for patterns that repeat between the parts, contrasting note values (maybe the solo has sixteenth notes and the piano is supporting by playing quarters or eighths), parallel vs. contrasting registers, etc. The more you know about what the other person is doing and how it relates to what you are doing, the better your prepared accompaniment will sound.

Listen. (A)  If you can find a recording of the piece you are to accompany, spend some time and listen to it. If your part is a piano reduction or a piece that has had orchestrations added to it, listen for what orchestral instruments are used to enhance the mood and musicality of the piece in its full edition. Envisioning a tuba or a piccolo will make a difference in how you approach relating portions of the work.

Listen. (B) When practicing with the one whom you are to accompany, develop the habit of listening to them, rather than to yourself. This takes work and sometimes a little mind-over-matter technique, but is well worth the effort.

Practice. Here again, this may seem like a no-brainer. You may be surprised, however, by the difference there can be between only ever playing with the soloist and taking time to study your own part between rehearsals.

 

Here are some of our favorite books for young string soloists, with each arrangement including a beautiful piano accompaniment. These make excellent practice for church pianists in training!

Cover tiny file look inside Come, Christians, Join to Sing Composed by Kristin Campbell. SoundForth #228841. Published by SoundForth (S2.228841).
Cover tiny file look inside Worship the King Easy Hymn Settings for Solo Violin and Piano. Composed by Kristin Campbell. Score and performance/accompaniment CD. Lorenz Publishing Company #30/2600L. Published by Lorenz Publishing Company (LO.30-2600L).

 

If you found this post helpful, click here to read other posts on music pedagogy.

 

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